The Artist-Fan Connection

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

So a while back I posted a prompt based on the book Carry On by Rainbow Rowell. It turns out this book is being re-released with a new paperback cover art. The cover art is pretty cool but cooler than that is that Rainbow Rowell posted on social media that she will be doing personalized signatures on copies of the book bought from an indie bookstore website called The Bookworm. It’s looks like a pretty reasonable price for fans to get a personal signed copy of the book. I’ve always loved the idea of book signings. I think that particularly for artists that are just starting out it’s important to see those that they admire reaping the rewards of success. Write a scene in which your character is meeting someone who she has admired the work of since first seeing it. What does this meeting feel like for your character? How does it influence her future?

P.S. To those that might want a personalized copy of your own, this is important, when you check out, please say who the book is for in the “order comments” field, which looks like this:

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

Living Between Dimensions

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I am reading the book Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones. Since seeing the movie, I have been wanting to read this story. It is excellent. There are as always a few differences between the movie and the book. In this case, much of the things missing in the movie change the type of story. For example, Sophie is a witch in the book and Howl is actually a from another dimension. These are some interesting differences but I’d say I still like the movie just as much as the book. (A rarity in my world.) I like this idea of bringing a character in from another dimension. Write a scene that includes a character that travels between dimensions.

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

Drawing The Line On Heroism

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I finished Fahrenheit 451 this week. Morally I found Guy Montag to be an interesting protagonist. *Spoilers* I would not label him a hero by any means. At the beginning of the story he is burning down houses without consideration of his actions and by the end of the story he has murdered another person. This moment was probably my favorite of the book which sounds a little bloodthirsty I know. But I’ve grown so tired of the characters that won’t kill because of some moral objection especially when their own life is on the line. Montag’s murder isn’t even for himself but for his companion Faber. At best you could label him chaotic good, but he is certainly not a hero. Where does your protagonist fall on the morality scale? Where do each of your characters fit? Do you represent each type: Lawful Good, Neutral Good, Chaotic Good, Lawful Neutral, True Neutral, Chaotic Neutral, Lawful Evil, Neutral Evil, and Chaotic Evil? Which do you find yourself most drawn to? Which are you most repelled by? Write a scene that explores your favorite and least favorite moralities clashing or otherwise interacting.

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

Believe What You Want

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I just finished reading H.G. Wells The Time Machine. I was familiar with the basic concept and elements of the story from having seen movies based on the book but as with most instance the book and movies are a bit different. The part of the story that most of us can probably relate to is the Time Traveler’s desire to tell his story. He genuinely doesn’t seem to care if they actually believe him but he wants to tell them the story anyway. Write a scene in which your character doesn’t care whether or not she’s believe but is relieved to be able to tell a story. What makes the story unbelievable? How long has your character felt the need to tell this story to someone? Did she wait for a specific person to tell it to or has she told many people because she wants to spread the story.

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

Signs of a Different Time

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I’m reading Lauren Graham’s novel Someday Someday, Maybe right now. In between many of the chapters there are copies of pages out of the main character’s day planner. The book is set in the 1990s and there are a few reminders so far of how much the world has changed just since the 90s till now. For example while this type of day planner isn’t extinct yet it’s much less common as most people tend to use smart phones instead these days. Write a scene set in a different time. Use different details to show your reader when it is without blatantly starting the date in the scene.

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

Fast Talking Self-Reflection

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I don’t read as much nonfiction as I probably should. Usually it has to be about a subject I want to research for my own writing. But very occasionally I see an autobiography book that excites me. That is the case with Lauren Graham’s Talking as Fast as I Can. It’s a very fun read because it feels like listening to an old friend tell you stories from her life. If you’re a fan of the Gilmore Girls series or even just of funny women in general it’s worth checking out. Something I always admired about the Gilmore Girls’ dialogue was how fast paced it was and Lauren Graham seems to bring that kind of speed talking into the voice of her book. Today practice writing some quick paced dialogue of your own. In fact write a scene where everything seems to be moving as quickly as possible.

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

Not A Happy Story

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I’ve been working my way through Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events lately. I wanted to have them fresh in my mind before I started watching the Netflix Original Series based on the books. If ever there was a series that lived up to its name this one is it. The story of the Baudelaire Orphans is indeed full of bad luck and unfortunate events. No one can claim to be surprised by this as the narrator tells us in pretty much every book that if we want a happy story we should put down the book and choose another. Take inspiration from this and write a story in which you announce the tone of the story at the very beginning. Like a self fulfilling prophecy of a sort, spend the rest of the story bringing this story to the point you informed the audience it would reach.

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

Same Events, Different Story

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I’m reading Mira Grant’s newest in the Newsflesh series Feedback. It is set at the same time as the original book Feed. But this time we are following a new cast of zombie fighting bloggers. I wasn’t sure about how I would feel about this because in concept it feels like selling me the same story twice. But there is definitely a difference. The events of the campaign that both stories follow might be the same but it is a different story for sure. Write a scene where you explore one of your older stories from a new cast’s point of view. Don’t adopt the point of view of one of the original story’s secondary characters. Bring on an entirely new cast. How are they involved in the events? What does their perspective reveal that wasn’t shown before?

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

The Magic of Dreams

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I’ve finished Maggie Stiefvater’s Raven Cycle series this week. It was definitely an interesting series for those that like fantasy stories. Much of the magic in the story revolves around dreams. More specifically the power to magically bring items out of dreams. There is quite a bit of the characters struggling to figure out if they are dreaming or awake throughout the series. Today write a scene that has your character questioning dreams. What do her dreams tell her? Are they magical as the dreams are in this series? Does she ever struggle to tell the difference between dreams and reality?

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades

Playing Off Assumptions

Hello Beautiful Thinkers,

I’ve gotten through all the books in the Please Don’t Tell My Parents I’m A Super Villain series by Richard Roberts this week. The audiobooks were available through the Hoopla app so I listened to them on my way to and from work. The protagonist is only thirteen which is much younger than I generally read lately. But they were entertaining all the same. As you can probably guess from the title the protagonist has a secret life as a super villain. She gets away with most of it because of the adult tendency to underestimate those younger than them and make assumptions that they know best. Write a scene where your character can benefit from some assumptions made about her. Does she take advantage of these assumptions or does she correct them?

Keep Dreaming Beautiful Thinkers,

The Boy In The Heart Shades